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Creating a more sustainable fish feed

Category : Aquaculture

Ryerson University researchers are using genomics to try to make fish feed more sustainable. A genetically engineered variety of camelina, an oilseed plant with naturally high omega-3 levels, is being tested to see if it could match the omega-3 levels that fish meal and fish oil provide and that aquaculture species require in their diets.

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Seaweed cuts cow burp methane

Category : Dairy

Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization has identified a strain of seaweed that can reduce the methane emissions of cattle burps by more than 99 per cent if added to cattle feed in small amounts.

Asparagopsis taxiformis, which grows in the tropical coastal waters of Queensland, Australia, appears to almost totally disrupt the action of gut enzymes that produce methane, keeping feed energy in the animal instead of being released into the atmosphere.

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Getting to know robo-mom

Category : Dairy

University of Guelph researchers are studying the design features of automated feeding stalls. That’s to see whether a calf’s learning process for using automated feeders can be accelerated. The goal of the project is to encourage equipment manufacturers to consider the animal’s needs when designing feeders alongside the practicality of their designs.

Full Article (page 36 October 2016 Milk Producer magazine)


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How one bull introduced a lethal gene into the Holstein breed

Category : Dairy

One of the most prolific bulls in the history of the Holstein breed also happened to carry a gene that has ultimately been responsible for an estimated half million spontaneous calf abortions worldwide. Researchers at University of California-Davis have now identified the responsible mutation, allowing farms to test for an avoid it. Pawnee Farm Arlinda Chief’s chromosomes account for almost 14 per cent of the genome in the current U.S. Holstein population.

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Study confirms benefits of using beef genetics in dairy beef supply chain

Category : Dairy

A New Zealand study has confirmed that dairy farmers could produce high value calves with minimal calving difficulties using proven beef genetics. With the beef industry increasingly depending on dairy calves, there’s a need for better genetics for meat production to improve product quality.

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High pressure processing can extend shelf life of beef

Category : Beef

 A study led by Dr. Haihong Wang of Alberta Agriculture and Forestry has discovered that high pressure processing of beef can significantly extend shelf life without affecting meat quality, sensory attributes or the nutritional value of marinated beef steaks. Thanks to study data, the technology has now gained regulatory approval from Health Canada.

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New cattle vaccine could minimize need for antibiotic use

Category : Beef

Kansas State University researchers have patented a new vaccine against Fusobacterium necrophorum infection. The bacterium affects sheep and cattle with liver abscesses, calf diphtheria and foot root or abscesses which are currently controlled using antibiotics.

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Group sow housing reduces energy costs

Category : Pork , Uncategorized

Work done at the Prairie Swine Centre has found that group sow housing can lower energy costs for producers. By housing sows in groups, room temperatures can be reduced from 15C to 9-10 C, reducing energy costs by approximately 78 per cent.

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Cinnamon as a health food?

Category : Pork

Research from Australia has found that cinnamon can help cool pigs’ stomachs, contributing to an overall improvement in their health. Cinnamon was found to cool the stomach during digestion by up to 2C by reducing the carbon dioxide gas that increases when pigs feed at room temperature.

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Wild turkeys not harbouring Avian Influenza

Category : Poultry

University of Guelph researchers have shown that wild turkeys, reintroduced in Ontario in the 1980s, are not harbouring Avian Influenza and other poultry diseases. Wild fowl populations are often feared to be carriers of diseases that can be transferred to their domestic cousins.

Full Article